Tag Archives: ants

Working Together

Ant collective behavior is heritable and shaped by selection (2020) Walsh et al., The American Naturalist, https://doi.org/10.1086/710709

Image Credit: Землеройкин, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Crux

Working together to achieve a common goal is nothing new to us. We as humans are famously social organisms that not only crave interactions with others, but quite often succeed due to the way that we work together. Interestingly, we tend to work well when we have some form of organizations or leadership, but there are other animals that do not require such leadership. This so-called “collective behavior” is the behavior of a group that emerges without a form of central control. Think of a large school of fish avoiding a predator at the same time, or birds flocking together and flying through the sky. All of this happens as a result of those animals interacting with one another, not because there is some boss animal telling them to do it.

Not surprisingly, groups of animals will vary in their exact method of collective behavior. It’s assumed that this variation is largely dependent on natural selection, but there isn’t actually much that is known about it. For this variation in behavior to have been the result of natural selection, the variation itself has to be advantageous and heritable, meaning that it is better to have the variation and you can then pass it on to your offspring. Today’s authors wanted to measure just that.

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