Tag Archives: data collection

Data in Colour: Bringing Photos Into Our Spreadsheets

Image Credit: Shiv’s fotografia, CC BY-SA 4.0, Image Cropped

When I think of the ecological data I typically work with, it usually tells me where plants or animals are, how many of them there are, and how those quantities might change. Most often, these organisms boil down to a few spreadsheet cells. But what if the questions you’re asking are less “where is the organism”, and more “what does it look like”? 

Photographic data is not a new phenomenon for scientists, but thanks to huge leaps in technology (hello, camera phones) it is a booming data source.  Community science – whereby members of the general public submit photos of species they’ve happened across – has seen a huge rise in popularity, thanks to apps and community platforms like iNaturalist. As a result, photo data is constantly growing in abundance, and many studies are quickly adapting to take advantage of this data source.

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To Get Great (Statistical) Power, It Takes Great Responsibility

Image Credit: Miss Ophelia, Pixabay licence, Image Cropped

There are a lot of questions in ecological research that ask whether or not something has changed over time, or put more simply, whether two things are different – vegetation levels, climate variables, maybe species diversity.

Suppose we are monitoring nutrient levels in a lake to make sure they stay at levels that are habitable for the fish living there. A change in policy about what is allowed to be dumped into the river by local factories was enacted, and we want to see if there is evidence that the nutrient levels have deteriorated in the year following the change when compared to the year before. 

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Field Experiences: Changing Lives, One Ecology Student at a Time

Bachelor students studying ecology collect data on a field course with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. (Image credit: Caitlin Mandeville, CC BY 2.0)

The first time I remember really thinking that I could be an ecologist was during a three-day trip to a field station in northern Wisconsin as part of my college limnology course. Sure, I already loved my ecology classes and learning about nature. But actually being a scientist? Real scientists, I thought, were people like my professors and graduate teaching assistants, who peppered their lectures with captivating tales of their own research.

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