Tag Archives: feral cat

Releasing the Devil

Conservation trade-offs: Island introduction of a threatened predator suppresses invasive mesopredators but eliminates a seabird colony (2020) Scoleri et al., Biological Conservation, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2020.108635

The Crux

Invasive species are a nightmare for local wildlife wherever they are, but on islands they’re even worse. Introduced predators can wipe out entire populations of species, as Tibbles the cat and his fellow feral buddies demonstrated in the extreme when they drove the Lyall’s wren extinct. On coastal islands this is a recurring theme. An invasive ‘mesopredator’ – like the American Mink in Europe or the cat in Australia – is introduced and quickly goes to work, often on small mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians alike.

Sometimes, but not always, introducing a top predator to an area can suppress the activities of the mesopredator. They can outcompete the mesopredator for resources, or begin to prey on them. The problem is, that if that top predator goes after the same food as the mesopredator, the local prey species suffer either way.

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Here Kitty: Our Love-Hate Relationship With Feral Cats

Image Credit: Alexey Komarov, CC BY-SA 4.0, Image Cropped

While outdoor and feral cats are pretty universally accepted by scientists these days to be environmental hazards of the most destructive kind, the fact remains that they’re… well, cats. They’ve been companion animals for millenia, and often the general public react strongly against proposed measures for feral cats (or even to being told to keep their own cats indoors).

So why is it that despite a wealth of science making the case for feral cat management, many people simply can’t get on board with keeping them in check? And why do ecologists even need the public onside in the first place?

To dig a bit deeper, I spoke to Brooke Deak, a socioecologist based at the University of Adelaide. Brooke has spent the last three years studying the feral cat management debate, trying to better understand the relationship between feral cats and the general public.

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