Tag Archives: fluctuation

Why Warmer Winters Don’t Always Help Geese

Image Credit: MaxPixel, CC0 1.0, Image Cropped

Contrasting consequences of climate change for migratory geese: Predation, density dependence and carryover effects offset benefits of high-arctic warming (2019) Layton-Matthews et al., Global Change BiologyDOI: 10.1111/gcb.14773

The Crux

Most of us know that climate change will bring warmer, shorter winters to most parts of the world. For many species in areas like the Arctic, it would be easy to interpret this as a good thing – plants grow earlier, so animals get more food, right? Naturally it’s never that simple. Many herbivorous species have evolved in sync with climate cycles so that their reproduction peaks when food becomes available. If season start dates change, these species may not be able to change their own cycles in time. Additionally, what happens if populations of their predators suddenly boom?

Today’s authors wanted to know what role a warming climate played in the population fluctuations of migratory barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis).

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The Best and Worst Movie Scientists

Image Credit: George Hodan, CC0 1.0, Image Cropped

We look at some of our favourite and least favourite movie scientists. Includes rants about lab coats, self testing and Spiderman.

2:12 – Robert Neville (I Am Legend)
8:32 – Curt Connors (The Amazing Spiderman)
19:38 – Poison Ivy (Batman & Robin)
26:28 – Rhonda LeBeck (Tremors)
30:36 – Victor Frankenstein
34:18 – Ira Kane (Evolution)

You can also find us on iTunes and Google Play.

We also have a bonus episode this week, seeing as we’re on Easter holidays and can’t find the time to record a full one. So please enjoy our analysis of the ecological ramifications of The Snap.

Are Animals Doing the Wrong Thing?

The great tit (Parus major) needs to gain more than 10 % of its body weight in pure fat every evening, in order to survive a cold winter night (Image Credit: Frank Vassen, CC BY 2.0, Image Cropped)

Short-term insurance versus long-term bet-hedging strategies as adaptations to variable environments (2019). Haaland, T.R. et al., Evolution, 73, 145-157.

The Crux

Why do animals behave the way they do? Behavioral ecology is a field of research trying to explain the ecological rationale of animal decision making. But quite often, it turns out the animals are doing the ‘wrong’ thing. Why don’t all animals make the same choice, when there clearly is a best option? Why do animals consistently do too little or too much of something?

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