Tag Archives: horse

Ass-ets

Non-native species are often portrayed as villains – although not without reason as they can often cause more harm than good. The wild horses and donkeys in America’s west are no exception – both having a bad rep amongst landowners for trampling vegetation and competing with livestock and native species. But they do do some good as well – and I say this after putting my love for ponies aside.

Research has shown that these equids are actually very good diggers – specifically digging wells to tap into underground water sources. These wells create artificial oases across the arid landscape – meaning that other (native) species don’t have to travel as far to water sources, competition at water points is rdduced (no Lion King-esque waterhole dance numbers ’round here) as well as providing water to plant species.

While the fact that equids are providing water sources doesn’t erase the more detrimental effects that invasive species can have on the environment, it does show that they can help promote biodiversity in some cases. Maybe its a case of giving credit to the good that comes with the bad.

The original article can be found here:  https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abd6775

Surprises From the Past: The Revelations of Ancient DNA

Forest Tundra on the Taymyr Peninsula between Dudinka and Norilsk near Kayerkan, Russia, taken in 2016. Was it always look like this? Should it look like this?
Image Credit: Ninaras, CC BY 4.0, Image Cropped

Although obtaining ancient DNA can be quite a headache, it is a very rewarding headache. After all the work that goes into obtaining DNA from a bone, fur, hair, or Viking’s leftover meal, researchers have to make sense of the apparent random sequence of nucleotide bases. But once that’s taken care of, there are a series of really interesting questions we can start to answer. Were DNA strands that are present in the modern times inherited from the past? How similar are today’s species to their forebears? Where is my pet velociraptor?

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