Tag Archives: invasive plants

Investigating the Invader-Pollinator Paradox

Image Credit: Ted, CC BY-SA 2.0, Image Cropped

Invader-pollinator paradox: Invasive goldenrods benefit from large-size pollinators (2021) Moroń, et al., Diversity and Distributions, https://doi.org/10.1111/ddi.13221

The Crux

A plant that invades a new part of the world can’t necessarily bring its regular pollinators along with it. So it stands to reason that plants who successfully invade a new area receives pollination from native pollinators. Seems pretty straightforward, right?

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What the Hell is On My Plant: A Botanist’s Guide to Metagenomics

Image Credit: Mislav Marohnić, CC BY 2.0, Image Cropped

If you’re unlucky, you already know that humans possess a skin microbiome. It sounds gross, but it’s simply an entire ecosystem of  microbes like bacteria living on our skin (maybe it is gross). Some of them help us, others might make us sick, for example when they enter open wounds. Plants have a similar set-up, hosting different ecosystems of bacteria on their leaves.

Hopefully, at this point I’ve made your skin crawl (because as you now know, it is literally crawling). But that microbiome can actually tell us some fascinating things about the animal or plant we’re looking at. So today, I’ll go through exactly what metagenomics is, and some of the information we can glean from a plant’s surface (I am a botanist after all).

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