Tag Archives: platypus

How Influential is the Platypus in Freshwater Dynamics?

Image Credit: Maria Grist, CC BY-SA 4.0, Image Cropped

Platypus predation has differential effects on aquatic invertebrates in contrasting stream and lake ecosystems (2020) McLachlan-Troup, Scientific Reports, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-69957-1

The Crux

A trophic cascade occurs when a predator’s effects of its prey goes on to affect ‘lower’ levels of that ecosystem. A great example is the effect that sea otters have on kelp: the sea otters prey extensively on sea urchins, which in turn increases the populations of kelp, which the sea urchins prey on. While this is a result of direct predation by otters, often this can occur through a prey species changing its behaviour to avoid the predators.

Yet most ecosystems are more complex than a simple three-level trophic system. Cascades are therefore more likely to occur when the ecosystem is less complex, or when there are well-defined relationships between species, as a result of a predator having preferred prey species or only a few groups of species making up an ecosystem.

This week’s authors investigated how the platypus (our recently-found-to-be-fluorescent friend) influences the abundance and species richness of invertebrates across both rivers and lakes, and whether it’s capable of affecting an ecosystems algae and sediments as well.

Read more

Platy-Party

Generally the platypus is considered a bit of an oddity. It’s an egg-laying mammal, has the bill of a duck, tail of a beaver, webbed feet, uses electrolocation, oh and its one of the few venomous mammals. Clearly the platypus was designed for the spotlight though – the UV spotlight that is.

It has recently been found that platypus fur glows a bluish-green colour under blacklight and is one of the few recorded cases of mammals exhibiting biofluorescence – alongside opossums and North American flying squirrels. Although it isn’t currently clear why a platypus is always ready for a night out at the disco (or if they can even perceive UV rays).

What other nocturnal animals may be hiding their own fluorescent secrets?

Tanya Strydom is a PhD student at the Université de Montréal, mostly focusing on how we can use machine learning and artificial intelligence in ecology. Current research interests include (but are not limited to) predicting ecological networks, the role species traits and scale in ecological networks, general computer (and maths) geekiness, and a (seemingly) ever growing list of side projects. Tweets (sometimes related to actual science) can be found @TanyaS_08.