Tag Archives: radar

Radar vs. Optical: Optimising Satellite Use in Land Cover Classification

An optical image of Kliuchevskoi volcano on the left, with a radar image on the left (Image credit: Michigan Tech Volcanology, Image Cropped)

Improving the accuracy of land cover classification in cloud persistent areas using optical and radar satellite image time series (2020), Lopes et al., Methods in Ecology and Evolution, https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13359

The Crux

Most ecologist has at some point run across or used a land cover map in their career. Whether it’s used for figuring out the canopy diversity of a forest, or figuring out which habitat a species is using, land cover maps are incredibly useful tools for everyone from conservationists to architects. But have you ever wondered how they are produced?

Until recently, land cover maps were created using either images from optical satellites or images from radar satellites with a coarse to medium spatial resolution (check out the Did You Know Section for more details, or the image above for an example). Combined with classification algorithms, land cover maps can be created automatically. That makes it sound simple, but the final output depends greatly on the quality and amount of images you use for the classification. Since 2014, the Copernicus Programme has made satellite imaginary freely available at high spatial and temporal spatial resolution. Due to this, optical and radar images can be combined more efficiently to produce land cover classification maps with enhanced accuracy. This is especially useful in tropical and boreal areas, as optical images often don’t show the entire landscape due to persistent cloud over.

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