Tag Archives: salmon

Salmon on the Lam

Image Credit: Isabell Schulz, CC BY-SA 2.0

Image Credit: Isabell Schulz, CC BY-SA 2.0, Image Cropped

Salmon on the lam: Drivers of escaped farmed fish abundance in rivers (2020) Mahlum et al., Journal of Applied Ecology, https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13804

The Crux

In a world with a growing human population and overfished seas, farming fish (aquaculture) could be a viable solution to our food security problems. Salmon aquaculture is already a massive industry worldwide, having grown substantially over the last half-century.

Yet the industry carries its own issues, one of which being its effect on wild salmon, which are of huge cultural importance to most lands that they’re found in. Wild salmon lifestyles see them migrate up rivers from the ocean to breed, with most salmon returning to the same rivers they were born in. Yet salmon escaping from fish farms have no spawning grounds to which to return, and can end up anywhere. This can result in deteriorating wild populations, with the farmed fish spreading disease and competing with the wild fish, as well as reducing wild fish health through interbreeding.

Because of this, figuring out where escaped salmon end up could be a major step forward for fish farms and local rivers alike. This week’s paper looks at what sort of variables lead to a river full of farmed salmon, and whether or not we can predict when and where they are likely to show up.

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Cooperation in the Aftermath of an Ecosystem Reboot

Today’s catch lays in front of me. As I marvel at how used to the stink of dead fish I’ve become, the fisher who brought them in points out a couple of larger Arctic charr as the researchers standing by him gush over the presence of a couple of tiny sticklebacks. He is fascinated by their appreciation of the smaller fish, which I had almost mistaken for baby trout. He offers to bring in more tomorrow if he can find them. It might not seem like the most significant of interactions, but it’s one more example of the willing assistance that the researchers here have enjoyed over the last week from local fishers.

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Studying Sustainability in Norway  

Image Credit: Alexey Topolyanksiy, Public Domain, Image Cropped

The Norwegian Aquaculture Review Council is an academic collective comprised of NTNU students Danielle Hallé, Myranda O’Shea, Bastian Poppe, Emmanual Eicholz and Peter Anthony Frank.

I think it’s fair to say that most of Norway looks like the postcards. If you can peel your eyes away from the views, you’ll notice the aquaculture sea cages along the fjords, sheep grazing in the outfield, the seemingly endless network of trails, wind parks off in the distance, or a happy forger with a bucket full of mushrooms. The natural landscape offers myriad, well-utilized benefits, which makes for an interesting location for studying sustainable development and our coexistence with nature. The course The Sustainable Management of Ecosystem Services at NTNU offered an opportunity to do just that.

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Are ecolabels greenwashing your farmed salmon?

Salmon aquaculture nets near Hitra, Norway. (Image credit: Peter Anthony Frank, NTNU, CC BY 2.0)

The Norwegian Aquaculture Review Council is an academic collective comprised of NTNU students Danielle Hallé, Myranda O’Shea, Bastian Poppe, Emmanual Eicholz and Peter Anthony Frank.

With so much attention on climate change and biodiversity in the media today, it is hard not to be skeptical as to whether companies are taking advantage of these paradigms for their own profit by “greenwashing” their products. Greenwashing is the common term for the practice whereby an organization presents information that gives them an air of environmental responsibility but makes no real contribution to reducing the impacts of threats like climate change, pollution, loss of biodiversity.

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A Snapshot of Ireland’s Ecological Landscape

Image Credit, Sam Perrin, CC BY 2.0

Last week, the NTNU University Museum’s Department of Natural History was benevolent enough to send its staff on a four day journey around Ireland. My previous experiences with Ireland have been two somewhat ill-fated trips on New Year’s Eve 2008 and St. Patrick’s Day 2012, so I was eager to see Ireland’s greener side. In an attempt to spruik some of the more interesting parts of the trip, I’ve broken it down below.

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The Pink Salmon

NINA researcheer Annette Taugbøl with a female pink salmon, caught electrofishing in northern Norway

NINA researcheer Annette Taugbøl with a female pink salmon, caught electrofishing in northern Norway (Photo Credit: Jon Museth, NINA-Lillehammer, CC BY-SA 4.0, Image Cropped)

Guest post by Odd Terje Sandlund

Today we focus on invaders from Russia. And whilst in the Trumpian era those words may sound horrifying, fear not (unless you’re a fish). In today’s guest post by NINA researcher Odd Terje Sandlund, we look at the pink salmon, a species that has arrived from Russia in the last 2 decades and is now making its way into Norwegian coastal waters.

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