• What 18,000 Empty Flights Does To A Climate Optimist

    Once in a while, something comes along that really makes it hard to cling to my determined sense of climate optimism. Yesterday the Lufthansa Group, a German company which controls a number of airlines, confirmed that just in this current winter, 18,000 flights were flown completely empty in order to keep the airlines’ slots open at European airports.

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  • Testing Invasive Frameworks In The Witcher

    Season two of The Witcher hit Netflix late last year, giving us the chance to have a look at some all-new movie creatures. I thought I’d traipse once more through the world of The Witcher and some of the concepts it brings up.

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  • The Ramifications of Clashes Between Wolves and Bears

    I’ve written a lot about our relationship with top predators like bears and wolves on Ecology for the Masses, but their relationship with each other is also capable of having a big impact on their surroundings. When bears co-exist with wolves, predation levels are generally higher, but how much higher really depends on how much competition takes place between the two species.

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  • The Dog Who Cried Wolf: Promoting Co-Existence With Carnivores Through Livestock Guarding Dogs

    Given the constant debate regarding the return of wolves to many parts of the world, finding ways to promote coexistence with them is key. Enter the Livestock Guarding Dog.

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  • Bigger is Better

    Host population size is theorized to affect host-pathogen coevolution, yet much of the evidence for this is theoretical. Today’s authors used an evolutionary experiment to test see if experimental evidence would support theory.

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  • Of Course Climate Change Is A Threat To Global Ecosystems

    Last week, prominent Australian conservation scientist Professor Hugh Possingham caused quite a stir when he stated that “personally [he is] not convinced that climate change is a threat to many species”. This naturally sparked heated debates among ecologists the world over, with varying levels of vitriol. As Dr. Charlie Gardner put it, it “is an extraordinary thing to hear from a leading conservation scientist” .

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  • Can We Figure Out Where Human-Wolf Conflicts Are The Most Likely?

    This week’s paper looks at human-wolf interactions in an area of Italy where the predators have slowly been increasing in number. Can we figure out where wolf-human conflicts are likely to arise?

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Current Issues

What 18,000 Empty Flights Does To A Climate Optimist

Once in a while, something comes along that really makes it hard to cling to my determined sense of climate optimism. Yesterday the Lufthansa Group, a German company which controls a number of airlines, confirmed that just in this current winter, 18,000 flights were flown completely empty in order to keep the airlines’ slots open at European airports.

Of Course Climate Change Is A Threat To Global Ecosystems

Last week, prominent Australian conservation scientist Professor Hugh Possingham caused quite a stir when he stated that “personally [he is] not convinced that climate change is a threat to many species”. This naturally sparked heated debates among ecologists the world over, with varying levels of vitriol. As Dr. Charlie Gardner put it, it “is an extraordinary thing to hear from a leading conservation scientist” .

Stats Corner & Words from the Experts

To Get Great (Statistical) Power, It Takes Great Responsibility

Failing to reject a null hypothesis that there is no difference between two samples doesn’t necessarily mean that there actually isn’t a difference. There is always a chance that we didn’t have enough evidence to detect a real difference. Finding ways to increase the power, the probability that we reject the null hypothesis when the alternative is really true, ahead of a study can help us feel more confident in our ultimate conclusion. This post talks about strategies for analyzing and increasing power in ecology settings.

On The Trail Of Explosive Seaweed Blooms

You’ve probably heard of the Sargasso Sea – it is well-known for the floating seaweed called Sargassum that provides a habitat for baby sea turtles and many other sea critters. For the last 10 years, Sargassum seaweed has spread throughout more of the Atlantic Ocean and become a problem, with blooms affecting the Caribbean, states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, South America and even Africa.

Conference Reviews & Paper of the week

The Ramifications of Clashes Between Wolves and Bears

I’ve written a lot about our relationship with top predators like bears and wolves on Ecology for the Masses, but their relationship with each other is also capable of having a big impact on their surroundings. When bears co-exist with wolves, predation levels are generally higher, but how much higher really depends on how much competition takes place between the two species.