• Shannon McCauley: The Rise of Community Ecology

    I sat down with community ecologist Doctor Shannon McCauley of the University of Toronto during her recent visit to the University of Arkansas. We attempted to put a little more context behind community ecology, and highlighted its relevance in the coming years.

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  • Populations Can’t Grow without Homes

    Today’s paper asks why sea otter populations haven’t recovered in light of ecological restoration.

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  • Bushfires like the ones that have ravaged Australia and California this year could become the new norm for the generation that has been born in the last decade, an example of how our perception of ecological change is defined by what has happened in our lifetime

    The Shifting of Ecological Baselines

    It’s no secret that our world has undergone rapid changes in the last few decades. Extreme weather events seem to be almost the norm these days, and species seem to be going extinct every minute. But as depressing as this may seem, they general doom and gloom we hear about the world on a daily basis still only represents a small percentage of the ills we’ve inflicted on our planet since we’ve been here.

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  • Parasites like the leech can be found in many places all over the world, and anyone growing up near freshwater knows to check for them. But many consider these animals "gross", so how can we motivate the public and scientists to care about them?

    Where is the Love for Parasites?

    More often than not, people cringe or look like they would rather run away than hear me talk about parasites. But it’s important that we understand how vital these organisms are to the natural world, and the benefits they offer to scientists and their research.

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  • A release of the formerly endangered Running River Rainbowfish. So how were they brought back from near-extinction?

    Peter Unmack & Karl Moy: Saving an Endangered Fish from Extinction

    We talk a lot about getting the public interested in conservation and ecosystems on Ecology for the Masses, but we’ve rarely talked about how conserving a species is actually accomplished. Where does funding come from? How do you decide which individuals to save? And how do you allow a population room to grow?

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Current Issues

Bushfires like the ones that have ravaged Australia and California this year could become the new norm for the generation that has been born in the last decade, an example of how our perception of ecological change is defined by what has happened in our lifetime

The Shifting of Ecological Baselines

It’s no secret that our world has undergone rapid changes in the last few decades. Extreme weather events seem to be almost the norm these days, and species seem to be going extinct every minute. But as depressing as this may seem, they general doom and gloom we hear about the world on a daily basis still only represents a small percentage of the ills we’ve inflicted on our planet since we’ve been here.

Parasites like the leech can be found in many places all over the world, and anyone growing up near freshwater knows to check for them. But many consider these animals "gross", so how can we motivate the public and scientists to care about them?

Where is the Love for Parasites?

More often than not, people cringe or look like they would rather run away than hear me talk about parasites. But it’s important that we understand how vital these organisms are to the natural world, and the benefits they offer to scientists and their research.

"We need the next generation of scientists to be at the coalface, communicating good scientific information."

Crossing the River Between Fishers and Fish Science

When a food source provides almost half a planet with protein, you can expect the people who deliver that food source to play an important role in society. Fishing is no exception. So it makes sense that fishers should have access to good fish science, at every level. It follows, then, that there should be open communication between fish scientists and fishers.

From the Experts