• It’s Who and Where You Are

    Host-parasite interactions depend on many different factors within ecological communities, and today’s study attempts to disentangle many of those factors to understand why one species is overwhelmingly parasitized

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  • Fishy Families

    The reproductive strategies of fish are far more complex than you’d probably expect, and are much more varied than other animals. With so many species sharing the same spaces, some species have found different strategies to survive and reproduce, like hiding their offspring somewhere unusual or carrying them around in the parent’s mouth in order to keep the offspring safer for a longer portion of their development.

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  • Where Did It Come From, Where Did It Go: The Digital Future of Fisheries

    Sometimes it is hard to look at the future with optimism. We seem to be facing crises in every facet of life, be it the humanitarian, environmental or economic side.

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  • The Egg-scalating Spread of Avian Influenza Across the United States

    Described by the United States Department of Agriculture as the “most expensive animal heath incident recorded in U.S. history”, the 2014-2015 avian influenza outbreak rocked the United States. 

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  • Can Fishes Adapt To Our Warming Oceans?

    Our oceans are warming, thanks to climate change. Some fish have shown the ability to acclimate to these warmer temperatures, but can they do enough?

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  • Who Is Simpson And What Does His Paradox Mean For Ecologists?

    Edward H. Simpson was a codebreaker at Bletchley Park, the home of Allied code-breakers during the Second World War. While you’d think this would be his claim to fame, perhaps his most lasting contribution is his description of Simpson’s paradox.

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  • Farming For Freshwater: Saving Farms And Pearl Mussels Through The KerryLIFE Project

    What does it take to make farmers care about biodiversity? Not much, is the answer. They already care a lot. In which case, what does it take to make them do something about it?

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  • Dispersal In A Globally-Invasive Widow Spider

    As I write this, I can hear invasive myna birds chirping in the trees outside, and see yellow pollen from the invasive Acacia trees floating through the air. What makes these species able to thrive far away from their native habitat? Despite the knowledge of how harmful invasive species can be, humans continue to transport species to new environments, both intentionally and unintentionally. Yet even with the explosive growth of both invasive species and invasion ecologists, we still don’t know a lot about which traits make the most successful invaders that can thrive and spread to new places.

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  • From Royal Prisons to Leaders in Conservation: A Brief History of Zoos

    Zoos have taken many forms since they first appeared thousands of years ago. What started as a collection of animals purely for the sake of royal entertainment has gradually evolved into a public source of education, conservation, and entertainment. When you ask someone to picture a zoo, they no longer picture an animal behind bars. However, it’s taken a long time for zoos to become bastions of conservation from their starting point as hallmarks of animal cruelty.

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Current Issues

Fishy Families

The reproductive strategies of fish are far more complex than you’d probably expect, and are much more varied than other animals. With so many species sharing the same spaces, some species have found different strategies to survive and reproduce, like hiding their offspring somewhere unusual or carrying them around in the parent’s mouth in order to keep the offspring safer for a longer portion of their development.

Stats Corner & Words from the Experts

Conference Reviews & Paper of the week