• Eva Plaganyi: Understanding the Human Side of Ecology

    At the ASFB 2018 Conference, I spoke to plenary speaker CSIRO’s Dr. Éva Plagányi, who works on maintaining the sustainability of marine life. Éva’s work includes interaction with everyone from corporate businessmen to indigenous island populations, and integrating social anthropology into her work has yielded great results. I spoke to Éva on the importance of incorporating social science into ecology.

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  • Battle of the Sexes

    This week we look at how male and female predators affect community composition due to difference in hunting tactics.

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  • The Culling of Kangaroos

    Having recently spent some time out in country New South Wales, I thought I’d share a quick description of the sight that greets you when you get out past Deniliquin in southern New South Wales and start driving north. It’s arid land, but it’s might still be beautiful were it not for the dead kangaroos that litter roadsides.

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  • Koalas are gorgeous, no doubt. But does their overwhelming charisma mean that we forget about other species?

    Kath Handasyde: Charisma, Culling and Conservation

    Australia plays host to a wonderful range of very endearing species. Tourists come from the world over to get up close with kangaroos or koalas. But the charisma of these animals can often lead to issues, whether it’s prioritisation of resources for them over other more endangered species, or even to the detriment of the species themselves.

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  • On the left, a thriving wetland. The right, an arid forest.

    Resuscitating Australia’s Floodplains: Environmental Water

    The Environmental Water Scheme will aim to rejuvenate one of Australia’s largest drainage basins. I looked at the pros and cons of the scheme during a week in the field.

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Current Issues

The Culling of Kangaroos

Having recently spent some time out in country New South Wales, I thought I’d share a quick description of the sight that greets you when you get out past Deniliquin in southern New South Wales and start driving north. It’s arid land, but it’s might still be beautiful were it not for the dead kangaroos that litter roadsides.

Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, 3 years before he passed away, rendering the species functionally extinct. But should species like this be the focus of our conservation efforts?

Rethinking Extinction

We are currently part of the most dramatic mass extinction event that the planet has ever seen, and more of these stories crop up every year. But is it a problem that the alarm bells are only raised when a creature hits the critically endangered level? And how do we even prioritise conservation efforts?

Species like koalas are cute and fluffy, and thus easy to provide funding for. But how do we save species that are more threatened and less charismatic?

Why Do We Only Care If It’s Fluffy?

After my recent talk with Marlene Zuk (which we’ll be publishing later this week), I have been thinking more about the species we focus on in ecology and the species we neglect. In ecology, conservationists have traditionally focused on a select few animals. But can we change what the public cares about, and ask them to focus more on the role of a species in an ecologic system?

From the Experts

Eva Plaganyi: Understanding the Human Side of Ecology

At the ASFB 2018 Conference, I spoke to plenary speaker CSIRO’s Dr. Éva Plagányi, who works on maintaining the sustainability of marine life. Éva’s work includes interaction with everyone from corporate businessmen to indigenous island populations, and integrating social anthropology into her work has yielded great results. I spoke to Éva on the importance of incorporating social science into ecology.