• Good Ecological News In Case COP26 Had You Feeling Down

    Another year has passed, and once again we’ve seen many world leaders make weighty promises to do better in their efforts to help the climate, only to do sharp about-faces once they’ve returned home. In an attempt to put aside some of the frustration that inevitably results from such grandstanding, let’s go through some of the more positive news stories that have popped up over the last month.

    Read more »
  • Marvel-ous Mythology and Bad Biologists

    We looked at some of the mythical Chinese creatures portrayed in Marvel’s recent outing, and some movie science tropes that always ignite a bit of ire for biologists.

    Read more »
  • Started at the Bottom, Now We’re Here…

    Models are an incredibly powerful tool for predicting how our world is likely to change, and today’s authors utilized a modelling approach to understand the future of an Arctic system.

    Read more »
  • To Get Great (Statistical) Power, It Takes Great Responsibility

    Failing to reject a null hypothesis that there is no difference between two samples doesn’t necessarily mean that there actually isn’t a difference. There is always a chance that we didn’t have enough evidence to detect a real difference. Finding ways to increase the power, the probability that we reject the null hypothesis when the alternative is really true, ahead of a study can help us feel more confident in our ultimate conclusion. This post talks about strategies for analyzing and increasing power in ecology settings.

    Read more »
  • On The Path Of The Prey Of The Pangolin

    Today’s researchers selected a particularly charismatic species, the Temminck’s pangolin, and through some truly admirable fieldwork, monitored whether or not their foraging activities changed in the face of the extreme conditions we are only likely to see more of as climate change worsens.

    Read more »
  • What COP26 Is And Why It Matters

    During the last couple have weeks, news reports, talk of renewed commitments, and lots of finger-pointing have been flying thick and fast COP26 has dominated the news over the past two weeks. The post pandemic world has watched as finger pointing and vague promises have emerged from Glasgow as talks progressed. But underlying all the drama is the realisation that the world is rapidly approaching a point of no return.

    Read more »
  • Bad Neighbors

    Natural communities are at risk the world over, and today’s study shows how disruption of key species interactions can harm an entire community.

    Read more »

Current Issues

Good Ecological News In Case COP26 Had You Feeling Down

Another year has passed, and once again we’ve seen many world leaders make weighty promises to do better in their efforts to help the climate, only to do sharp about-faces once they’ve returned home. In an attempt to put aside some of the frustration that inevitably results from such grandstanding, let’s go through some of the more positive news stories that have popped up over the last month.

What COP26 Is And Why It Matters

During the last couple have weeks, news reports, talk of renewed commitments, and lots of finger-pointing have been flying thick and fast COP26 has dominated the news over the past two weeks. The post pandemic world has watched as finger pointing and vague promises have emerged from Glasgow as talks progressed. But underlying all the drama is the realisation that the world is rapidly approaching a point of no return.

Stats Corner & Words from the Experts

To Get Great (Statistical) Power, It Takes Great Responsibility

Failing to reject a null hypothesis that there is no difference between two samples doesn’t necessarily mean that there actually isn’t a difference. There is always a chance that we didn’t have enough evidence to detect a real difference. Finding ways to increase the power, the probability that we reject the null hypothesis when the alternative is really true, ahead of a study can help us feel more confident in our ultimate conclusion. This post talks about strategies for analyzing and increasing power in ecology settings.

On The Trail Of Explosive Seaweed Blooms

You’ve probably heard of the Sargasso Sea – it is well-known for the floating seaweed called Sargassum that provides a habitat for baby sea turtles and many other sea critters. For the last 10 years, Sargassum seaweed has spread throughout more of the Atlantic Ocean and become a problem, with blooms affecting the Caribbean, states surrounding the Gulf of Mexico, South America and even Africa.