Tag Archives: Invasive Species

Forecasting Worldwide Alien Invasions

Image Credit: Bernard Dupont, CC BY-SA 2.0, Image Cropped

Projecting the continental accumulation of alien species through to 2050 (2020) Seebens at al., Global Change Biology, DOI: 10.1111/gcb.15333

The Crux

A by-product of globalisation is that over the coming decades, no matter how many episodes of Border Patrol get recorded, new species are going to find their way into new habitats and potentially become invasive alien species, exerting negative effects on the locals. We’ve seen this in the past, and I’ve beaten many a dead horse writing about these species on this site.

What this paper set out to find is whether or not we can predict at what scale this trend will increase.

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Assessing the Impact of the Newly Introduced European Flounder

Image Credit: Tiit Hunt, CC BY-SA 3.0, Image Cropped

Guest Post by Theresa Henke

First record of niche overlap of native European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and non-indigenous European flounder (Platichthys flesus) on nursery grounds in Iceland (2020) Henke et al., Aquatic Invasions, In Press

The Crux

Determining whether or not an introduced species is invasive is important, as it determines whether or not management steps need to be taken to slow or eliminate any negative impacts it might have on the local ecosystem. In Iceland, 15 introduced species have been recorded over the past decades but only six of them are currently classified as invasive or potentially invasive. One of these potentially invasive species is the European flounder (Platichthys flesus), a flatfish commonly found in coastal waters of Europe. The flounder is a catadromous fish, meaning it spawns in marine habitats but has the ability to survive in freshwater streams as well.

In 1999, the flounder was firstly identified in Icelandic waters in the southwest of the country. Since then it has rapidly spread clockwise around the country. Currently, it can be found in every part of Iceland, mostly in estuaries but also up in rivers and lakes. Juvenile flounder can be found on nursery grounds in shallow, brackish waters where they overlap with juvenile European plaice (Pleuronectes platessa). Plaice is a commercially important flatfish species native to Iceland. Despite the knowledge of the flounder’s arrival in Iceland in 1999, not much research has been conducted on the impact of this potentially invasive species.

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Here Kitty: Our Love-Hate Relationship With Feral Cats

Image Credit: Alexey Komarov, CC BY-SA 4.0, Image Cropped

While outdoor and feral cats are pretty universally accepted by scientists these days to be environmental hazards of the most destructive kind, the fact remains that they’re… well, cats. They’ve been companion animals for millenia, and often the general public react strongly against proposed measures for feral cats (or even to being told to keep their own cats indoors).

So why is it that despite a wealth of science making the case for feral cat management, many people simply can’t get on board with keeping them in check? And why do ecologists even need the public onside in the first place?

To dig a bit deeper, I spoke to Brooke Deak, a socioecologist based at the University of Adelaide. Brooke has spent the last three years studying the feral cat management debate, trying to better understand the relationship between feral cats and the general public.

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Forecasting Europe’s (Very Specific) Rodent Problem

Image Credit: Birgit, Pixabay Licence, Image Cropped

The potential current distribution of the coypu (Myocastor coypus) in Europe and climate change induced shifts in the near future (2020) Schertler et al., NeoBiota, https://doi.org/10.3897/neobiota.58.33118

The Crux

For all my talk on not immediately demonising alien species, there are a plethora of annoying little critters who the label ‘invasive’ was made for. This is the case with the Coypu, an annoying beaver-like rodent initially from South America who has since spread through other parts of the world, including large swathes of Europe.

The Coypu is a textbook invader – it reproduces quickly, and though individuals don’t stray far from rivers, as a species they are capable of expanding their range very quickly. They destabilise riverbanks through their burrowing, which can lead to severe ecological and economical damage.

They are, however, quite sensitive to temperature, and as such it’s important to know what the effects of climate change will have on their distribution. Today’s authors set out to come up with a habitat suitability map for the Coypu in light of the rise in temperature we’re expecting in the coming decades.

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Ecological Modelling, the Coronavirus, and Why They’re Not A Perfect Match

Image Credit: Pharexia, Ratherous, AKS471883, Source Data from  Johns Hopkins University CSSEThe Centers for Disease Control and PreventionNew York TimesCNBC.

As it quickly became clear in late February and early March that COVID-19 was not going away anytime soon, attention turned to trying to figure out when and where the virus would spread. Epidemiologists and virologists have had their work cut out for them, trying to simultaneously reassure and warn people the world over about the dangers, the nature and the potential timeline of the virus.

So it came as somewhat of a surprise to see ecologists try and tip their hat into the ring. Early on in the pandemic, teams of ecologists sprang up, trying to use Species Distribution Models to predict the spread of the virus. And whilst this might sound helpful, many of these studies lacked collaboration with epidemiologists, and their predictions very quickly fell flat. Some studies suggested that areas like Brazil and Central Africa would be largely spared by the virus, which quickly turned out not to be the case. Flaws in the studies were spotted quite quickly by concerned members of both the ecological and epidemiological communities alike, and a few teams got started on responses.

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Aliens & Invaders & Exotics, Oh My: The Language of Invasive Biology

The Burmese python, which has spread throughout the Everglades in Florida as a result of accidental or intentional releases by pet owners (Image Credit: US NInvaders, Aliens, and tational Park ServicePublic Domain Mark 1.0, Image Cropped)

Language is important. It’s a lesson many biological scientists would have learned a long time ago if we hadn’t kept social sciences at such a wary arm’s length. Ecologists have a tendency to label and relabel ecological concepts (anyone up for a debate about the word ‘niche’?), species and even global phenomena (think global warming vs. climate change) based on anything from shifts in public perception to new findings that challenge our earlier labels.

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